The power of words

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Wordsmatter
Words have a magical power. They can bring either the greatest happiness or deepest despair; they can transfer knowledge from teacher to student; words enable the orator to sway his audience and dictate its decisions. Words are capable of arousing the strongest emotions and prompting all men's actions.     

~ Sigmund Freud

 


Crisp nights of fall and a cup of tea deserve a good read!

BookcoverThis small journal of 20 engaging stories will warm your heart and boost your spiritual life. Ignatian prayers and reflection questions will help make an enjoyable read a very rich experience.

“If you want to find God, know love, and truly understand these are the same, read this beautiful book. ...What a perfect dose of grace this book is for people of all backgrounds!"  Rabbi Irwin Kula, author of “Yearnings: Embracing the Sacred Messiness of Life”

While our Pay Pal button is being updated, you may place your order for $5 per book, plus $2.70 each for shipping for 1-2 books or $6 shipping for 3-12 books with an email to mary.wellspring@yahoo.com. Please include contact phone number and address for billing. Supply is now limited.

Send a check or money order to Mary Morrell (with the word LOVE and #s of copies noted in the Memo) to Wellspring Communications, PMB 167, 1162 St. Georges Avenue, Avenel, NJ  07001.  Please don't forget to include return address.  

As always we welcome your comments and questions!

 


Recognizing the importance of the how

If medium truly is the message, as philosopher of communications Marshall McLuhan professed Message-in-a-bottlesome 50 years ago, then it is essential that an organization or an individual not only identify and embrace the message to be communicated, but evaluate the means by which the message is imparted.

If the message is one of faith and faith's inherent values, it will fall on deaf or hostile ears if we, as the medium, reflect something contrary to the message.

 

 

 

Image obtained from www.thehistoryblog.com


Never too old to learn like a child

Years ago I was lured into buying a paperback child’s travel book for my young grandson because Travel logthe book’s title brought back years of memories from traveling with six sons and listening to the infamous words:

“Are We There Yet??”

The book found its way back to my house and sits on a shelf near my computer. I can always see it out of the corner of my eye while I’m writing, and recently I find myself repeating the title in my head while I’m working on something, “Are we there yet, are we there yet?”

In frustration I decide to leaf through the book again, and I realize that many of the puzzles, activities and games on the pages could be useful exercises of reflection for my writing, my business and my life.

Take for example the “TRAVEL LOG,” a page divided into four squares, with bright primary colors and a cartoon car speeding along the top banner. The four squares are titled “Been There” “Done That” “I’d Like to GO There” and I NEVER Want to go There.”

Pardon me while I get my crayons. 


Historic Preservation: The Road to Remembering

HIGH ABOVE THE PATCHWORK QUILT FARMLANDS OF the Hudson Valley near Albany, New 120px-Indian_Ladder_2 York, sits John Boyd Thacher State Park, cresting miles of limestone cliff face and traveling deep into forests, down rocky slopes to grassy fields. It was here, as a child, where I first walked the Indian Ladder Trail with my dad. It was here where my love for the past was nurtured by the stories of the Mohawk Iroquois Indians who, several hundred years earlier, had walked a trail back and forth to Henry Hudson’s trading post. To scale the cliffs they felled tall trees against the cliff wall and cut back the branches, creating what the early settlers called Indian ladders.

In the late 1800s, philanthropist John Boyd Thacher established a summer residence in the area and purchased hundreds of acres of land, including more than a three-mile expanse of the cliff ledge. The Indian Ladder Trail and a number of other sites of natural and historic beauty were part of his estate; land which he made available to the public for their enjoyment. … (read the rest here:   

http://gardenstatelegacy.com/files/Historic_Preservation_Road_to_Remembering_Morrell_GSL11.pdf

Published in GardenStateLegacy.com Issue 11 • March 2011